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The latest posts tagged with “ios

 
[In iOS,] when you’re choosing your alarm sound, double-tap it instead of single-tapping it. You’ll select the sound without auditioning it first. And that should let everyone sleep better.

It’s this kind of thoughtfulness and attention to detail that makes using Apple operating system devices such a joy.

It’s this kind of nuanced detail that’s not documented and impossible to find that makes using Apple operating system devices so frustrating to use.

(Source: macworld.com)

 

Something more important than number of apps per mobile OS

Every time I read a review of a new device that competes with an iOS counterpart, there’s always a major bullet point comparing the number of apps for iOS with the paucity of apps for [insert competitor product here]. Lately, it’s the webOS-based TouchPad from H-P.

I can see where there’s a legitimate point comparing app counts. But I think there’s a more significant aspect of the platform that should be evaluated: its ability to create, distribute and support apps for the new platform. And most importantly, the ability to monetize your app in a number of ways. 

There has been a lot of discussion of fragmentation in the Android world. Not just the physical devices, but also the app stores themselves (Google’s and Amazon’s are headliners, but there are others, and more to come on the horizon). RIM’s support for Blackberry (and QNX) apps pretty much just pisses people off. 

But so far, I’m holding my breath to see how WebOS and its support for third-party apps pans out. I think that’s the dark horse differentiator to watch.

 

Update to my previous post

In a post last week, I asked, “… if the [iPhone] 3GS will be able to run [iOS 5] as well as subsequent dot releases”.

At today’s Apple World Wide Developer Conference, it was confirmed that the iPhone 3GS, as well as both iPads and the two latest iPod touch models, will indeed be able to run iOS 5. 

That doesn’t mean that Larry Dignan’s speculation will pan out, of course. This was just one aspect that I personally felt would be relevant. It’s gonna be really interesting to see what comes down the pike alongside the new iPhone later this fall.

 
 
 
 
BGR reports:
…in order to patch this particular bootrom hack (for iOS 4.1) Apple would need “a whole new processor rev.” A re-flashed or patched bootrom for the current hardware would not be sufficient.
—Da-a-a-mn!

BGR reports:

…in order to patch this particular bootrom hack (for iOS 4.1) Apple would need “a whole new processor rev.” A re-flashed or patched bootrom for the current hardware would not be sufficient.


Da-a-a-mn!

 
 
Apple is Killing the Camera Competition… with a Phone!
AppleInsider has a quick review of the new HDR capability that will soon be available on all camera-equipped devices running iOS 4.1.
HDR - that is, High Definition Range photography - is something that heretofore has generally been known only to high-end photographers with fancy cameras, specialized software, and the ability to use it all. The gist of it is that you take several pictures of the same scene taken with different exposure settings. Then you mathematically combine them together in such way that overly-dark portions of the image are brightened and overly-bright portions are toned down, all while improving the general detail. The end result of this process can be striking.
Apple has taken all of these high falutin’ concepts and created a system that intelligently does all the hard work for you. 
In my opinion, Apple has set a new standard for usability for photography in general and digital cameras in particular. Canon’s working on in-camera HDR, too having filed a patent for it recently. Sony already offers a couple of high-end models that perform some low-grade HDR. But Apple is changing the game altogether. Here’s why:
Apple’s iPod touches and iPhones are running with real CPUs in them. The latest models are powered by Apple’s powerful and efficient A4 chip. So iOS is able to perform Photoshop-grade manipulation of the HDR images and churn out high-quality results. But that’s just the beginning. 
When’s the last time you upgraded the firmware on your point-and-shoot camera or on your dSLR? Right. Never. 
But Apple updates iOS several times a year. They’ll be able to really push the envelope of HDR capabilities as fast as they can code them. I wouldn’t be surprised if they eventually introduced automatic tone mapping as well. 
Now, since Apple’s iPhone 4 already has the best smartphone camera on the market today, it’s kind of surprising that they’d put effort into what no one else has effectively done… bringing HDR capability to the layman. But then, this is Apple we’re talking about.
But what excites me is not so much that Apple did this. Or that it’s on the iPhone and new iPod touch. It’s exciting because dedicated camera manufacturers will necessarily have to step up their game and lower their price. And we’ll all get much better photos as a result.

Apple is Killing the Camera Competition… with a Phone!

AppleInsider has a quick review of the new HDR capability that will soon be available on all camera-equipped devices running iOS 4.1.

HDR - that is, High Definition Range photography - is something that heretofore has generally been known only to high-end photographers with fancy cameras, specialized software, and the ability to use it all. The gist of it is that you take several pictures of the same scene taken with different exposure settings. Then you mathematically combine them together in such way that overly-dark portions of the image are brightened and overly-bright portions are toned down, all while improving the general detail. The end result of this process can be striking.

Apple has taken all of these high falutin’ concepts and created a system that intelligently does all the hard work for you.

In my opinion, Apple has set a new standard for usability for photography in general and digital cameras in particular. Canon’s working on in-camera HDR, too having filed a patent for it recently. Sony already offers a couple of high-end models that perform some low-grade HDR. But Apple is changing the game altogether. Here’s why:

Apple’s iPod touches and iPhones are running with real CPUs in them. The latest models are powered by Apple’s powerful and efficient A4 chip. So iOS is able to perform Photoshop-grade manipulation of the HDR images and churn out high-quality results. But that’s just the beginning.

When’s the last time you upgraded the firmware on your point-and-shoot camera or on your dSLR? Right. Never.

But Apple updates iOS several times a year. They’ll be able to really push the envelope of HDR capabilities as fast as they can code them. I wouldn’t be surprised if they eventually introduced automatic tone mapping as well.

Now, since Apple’s iPhone 4 already has the best smartphone camera on the market today, it’s kind of surprising that they’d put effort into what no one else has effectively done… bringing HDR capability to the layman. But then, this is Apple we’re talking about.

But what excites me is not so much that Apple did this. Or that it’s on the iPhone and new iPod touch. It’s exciting because dedicated camera manufacturers will necessarily have to step up their game and lower their price. And we’ll all get much better photos as a result.

 

Update to iOS 4 completed at 15:03 CDT.

(posted from my Tumblr app)

 
Come on!!

Come on!!

 
 

iOS 4 upgrade will be free for iPod touch.

Steve Jobs “couldn’t be happier” about it. Me, too.

 

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