robmandu

The latest posts tagged with “photography

The wallpaper in my hotel room. No, not the lobby. Not the bar. Not the pool or fitness area. In my room.

The wallpaper in my hotel room. No, not the lobby. Not the bar. Not the pool or fitness area. In my room.

 

Compressed 02 from Kim Pimmel on Vimeo.

Kim Pimmel combined everyday soap bubbles with exotic ferrofluid liquid to create an eerie tale, using macro lenses and time lapse techniques. Black ferrofluid and dye race through bubble structures, drawn through by the invisible forces of capillary action and magnetism. 

via Kottke

 
The bluebonnet, also known as the buffalo clover, is the official state flower of Texas.

The bluebonnet, also known as the buffalo clover, is the official state flower of Texas.

 
Spacesuit on Fire by Jack Crossing (via Fluther)

Spacesuit on Fire by Jack Crossing (via Fluther)

 
Cruze is 9 months old!
- click the photo to ridiculously embiggen for detail -
BTW, why bother picking up around the house when you can manipulate depth of field in your favor?
—————-
dSLR: Nikon D40F-stop: f/1.8 Exposure: 1/400ISO: 800Exposure bias: -0.7 step

Cruze is 9 months old!

- click the photo to ridiculously embiggen for detail -

BTW, why bother picking up around the house when you can manipulate depth of field in your favor?

—————-

dSLR: Nikon D40
F-stop: f/1.8 
Exposure: 1/400
ISO: 800
Exposure bias: -0.7 step

 
Twenty Four Hour View of the Sky - Earth Science Picture of the Day

Twenty Four Hour View of the Sky - Earth Science Picture of the Day

 
 
Huh… interesting result from accidentally leaving the camera in “photocopy” mode.

Huh… interesting result from accidentally leaving the camera in “photocopy” mode.

 

From LensCulture:

The chronological series begins in 1936, when a 16-year-old girl from Tilburg in Holland picks up a gun and shoots at the target in a shooting gallery. Every time she hits the target, it triggers the shutter of a camera and a portrait of the girl in firing pose is taken and given as a prize.

And so a lifelong love affair with the shooting gallery begins. This series documents almost every year of the woman’s life (there is a conspicuous pause from 1939 to 1945) up until present times.

At the age of 88 Ria van Dijk still makes her pilgrimage to the Shooting Gallery.

 
 
Check out the reverberating shockwave on its way back to merge with the main fireball from this nuclear test blast. (via New York Times)

Check out the reverberating shockwave on its way back to merge with the main fireball from this nuclear test blast. (via New York Times)

 
Want instant vintage photos?
Mount a 1908 Wollensak 35mm F5.0 Cine-Velostigmat hand-cranked lens onto a Canon 5D Mark II. 
The results are impressive.

Want instant vintage photos?

Mount a 1908 Wollensak 35mm F5.0 Cine-Velostigmat hand-cranked lens onto a Canon 5D Mark II. 

The results are impressive.

 
Apple is Killing the Camera Competition… with a Phone!
AppleInsider has a quick review of the new HDR capability that will soon be available on all camera-equipped devices running iOS 4.1.
HDR - that is, High Definition Range photography - is something that heretofore has generally been known only to high-end photographers with fancy cameras, specialized software, and the ability to use it all. The gist of it is that you take several pictures of the same scene taken with different exposure settings. Then you mathematically combine them together in such way that overly-dark portions of the image are brightened and overly-bright portions are toned down, all while improving the general detail. The end result of this process can be striking.
Apple has taken all of these high falutin’ concepts and created a system that intelligently does all the hard work for you. 
In my opinion, Apple has set a new standard for usability for photography in general and digital cameras in particular. Canon’s working on in-camera HDR, too having filed a patent for it recently. Sony already offers a couple of high-end models that perform some low-grade HDR. But Apple is changing the game altogether. Here’s why:
Apple’s iPod touches and iPhones are running with real CPUs in them. The latest models are powered by Apple’s powerful and efficient A4 chip. So iOS is able to perform Photoshop-grade manipulation of the HDR images and churn out high-quality results. But that’s just the beginning. 
When’s the last time you upgraded the firmware on your point-and-shoot camera or on your dSLR? Right. Never. 
But Apple updates iOS several times a year. They’ll be able to really push the envelope of HDR capabilities as fast as they can code them. I wouldn’t be surprised if they eventually introduced automatic tone mapping as well. 
Now, since Apple’s iPhone 4 already has the best smartphone camera on the market today, it’s kind of surprising that they’d put effort into what no one else has effectively done… bringing HDR capability to the layman. But then, this is Apple we’re talking about.
But what excites me is not so much that Apple did this. Or that it’s on the iPhone and new iPod touch. It’s exciting because dedicated camera manufacturers will necessarily have to step up their game and lower their price. And we’ll all get much better photos as a result.

Apple is Killing the Camera Competition… with a Phone!

AppleInsider has a quick review of the new HDR capability that will soon be available on all camera-equipped devices running iOS 4.1.

HDR - that is, High Definition Range photography - is something that heretofore has generally been known only to high-end photographers with fancy cameras, specialized software, and the ability to use it all. The gist of it is that you take several pictures of the same scene taken with different exposure settings. Then you mathematically combine them together in such way that overly-dark portions of the image are brightened and overly-bright portions are toned down, all while improving the general detail. The end result of this process can be striking.

Apple has taken all of these high falutin’ concepts and created a system that intelligently does all the hard work for you.

In my opinion, Apple has set a new standard for usability for photography in general and digital cameras in particular. Canon’s working on in-camera HDR, too having filed a patent for it recently. Sony already offers a couple of high-end models that perform some low-grade HDR. But Apple is changing the game altogether. Here’s why:

Apple’s iPod touches and iPhones are running with real CPUs in them. The latest models are powered by Apple’s powerful and efficient A4 chip. So iOS is able to perform Photoshop-grade manipulation of the HDR images and churn out high-quality results. But that’s just the beginning.

When’s the last time you upgraded the firmware on your point-and-shoot camera or on your dSLR? Right. Never.

But Apple updates iOS several times a year. They’ll be able to really push the envelope of HDR capabilities as fast as they can code them. I wouldn’t be surprised if they eventually introduced automatic tone mapping as well.

Now, since Apple’s iPhone 4 already has the best smartphone camera on the market today, it’s kind of surprising that they’d put effort into what no one else has effectively done… bringing HDR capability to the layman. But then, this is Apple we’re talking about.

But what excites me is not so much that Apple did this. Or that it’s on the iPhone and new iPod touch. It’s exciting because dedicated camera manufacturers will necessarily have to step up their game and lower their price. And we’ll all get much better photos as a result.

 
The Big Picture captures stormy skies.

The Big Picture captures stormy skies.

 
Your Beautiful Eyes (via Photography Served .com)

Your Beautiful Eyes (via Photography Served .com)

 

Page 1 of 4

About

NOTICE.
--
Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.
--
BY ORDER OF THE AUTHOR
Per G. G., CHIEF OF ORDNANCE

Stuff I like

See more stuff I like

Credits